All Winter-Spring 2013 Short Courses Classes

Art and Science: Film, Photography, Digital Video

Still and motion pictures can be emotionally charged, but there is a great deal of science as well as creativity involved in producing these images. This course attempts to demystify some of the scientific foundations of photography, film and digital video. Three weeks are devoted to each medium as students deal with topics such as camera construction, emulsion and darkroom chemistry, exposure relationships, manipulating lighting contrast ratios, the elements of the video image, compression and human perceptual traits. Students will gain an understanding of the ways in which traits can be manipulated to create different “looks,” perceptual effects and viewer responses. Grading is based on class participation and exams. This course can be taken for two credits at most of our educational partner schools. The non-credit tuition for this course is $275 (course fee included).

Prerequisite(s):
None. 27 classroom hours.
Section(s):
  • Monday 10:00 – 1:00: 1/28, 2/4, 2/11, 2/18, 2/25
French Cinema: From Melies to Amelie

Starting out with films by the Lumiere Brothers, who made some of the very first motion pictures in the late 1800s and Georges Melies’ 1903 science-fantasy extravaganza,  A Trip To The Moon, the class will explore a wide range of French film styles and periods of filmmaking. The 1930s saw the work of Jean Renoir and the impact of his mise-en-scene style of directing. The class will watch excerpts and discuss the innovations of the French New Wave of the early 1960s, headlined by directors like Truffaut and Godard, while addressing the rise of the auteur theory. Finally, students will consider the whimsy of modern French comedy by the imaginative Jean-Pierre Jeunet. Discussions will include the evolution, influence, politics and passions of this national cinema. Grading is based on participation and one short paper.

Prerequisite(s):
None. 14 classroom hours.
Section(s):
  • Tuesdays 6:00 - 9:30: 1/22, 1/29, 2/5, 2/12 O’Sullivan
German Cinema: From Nosferatu to Run Lola Run

The art of German cinema really blossomed in the 1920s and was part of a movement known as German Expressionism. This class will look at classic examples (including Metropolis) from this era and discuss the overarching influence this style has had on directors ever since. Students will also see examples from The New German Cinema of the 60s and 70s, featuring upstart young directors like Fassbinder and Herzog, and it will wrap up with a discussion about the changes in Germany’s films, in tone and technique, after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. Grading is based on participation and one short paper.

Prerequisite(s):
None. 14 classroom hours
Section(s):
  • Tuesdays 6:00 - 9:30: 4/2, 4/9, 4/16, 4/23 O’Sullivan
International Film History Short Courses

These new short courses offer a taste of foreign film history. The three 4-week sessions concentrate on the distinct flavors of French, German, and Japanese Cinemas. Take one, two, or all three. The non-credit tuition for each separate Film History Short Course is $150; for students who register for all three short courses, the tuition is $390. No other discounts apply to tuition for these courses, and no course fee is added forthese courses. Each of these short courses may be taken for one credit at most of our educational partner schools. 

Prerequisite(s):
None. 42 Classroom Hours
Section(s):
  • See Individual Courses for Sections
Japanese Cinema: From Kurosawa to Miyazaki

The thread between cinema, history and culture in Japan will be discussed as the class studies one of the masters of international cinema, Akira Kurosawa. The course will include watching excerpts from Kurosawa’s films (such as Rashomon, Seven Samurai and Ran) and discussing his craft, his connection to Shakespeare and the samurai code, his influence on other filmmakers and more. The course will conclude with a look at the phenomenon of anime: its origins, its spiritual side as well as its violent side and its connection to Japanese youth. Grading is based on participation and one short paper.

Prerequisite(s):
None. 14 classroom hours.
Section(s):
  • Tuesdays 6:00 - 9:30: 2/26, 3/5, 3/19, 3/26 O’Sullivan